bn:00055257n
Noun Concept
Categories: United States criminal investigation law, All articles needing additional references, Miranda warning case law
EN
Miranda rule  Miranda warning  Miranda advisement  public safety exception  You Have the Right to Remain Silent
EN
The rule that police (when interrogating you after an arrest) are obliged to warn you that anything you say may be used as evidence and to read you your constitutional rights (the right to a lawyer and the right to remain silent until advised by a lawyer) WordNet 3.0
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EN
The rule that police (when interrogating you after an arrest) are obliged to warn you that anything you say may be used as evidence and to read you your constitutional rights (the right to a lawyer and the right to remain silent until advised by a lawyer) WordNet 3.0 & Open English WordNet
In the United States, the Miranda warning is a type of notification customarily given by police to criminal suspects in police custody advising them of their right to silence and, in effect, protection from self-incrimination; that is, their right to refuse to answer questions or provide information to law enforcement or other officials. Wikipedia
Established in 1966 by the Miranda v. Arizona Supreme Court ruling Wikipedia Disambiguation
Notification given by American police to criminal suspects in police custody advising them of their rights, or similar procedure in other jurisdictions Wikidata
A warning given by a law enforcement officer to criminal suspects in his custody advising them of certain constitutional rights, called their Miranda rights. Wiktionary